GHA Conference Program

The Graduate History Association’s 10th Annual Conference

History in the Making

Pivotal Moments in Public Understanding

Saturday, March 29, 2014

8:30-9:30 – Isenberg Atrium

Registration & Breakfast

Opening Remarks

9:30 – 10:45 – First Panel Sessions

Memory and Popular Culture – Isenberg 112

Chair: David Glassberg, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Presentations:

  •   Napoleon and the Americans

Mark Ehlers, Department of History, Louisiana State University

  •   Complicating the Captive African History of Western New England

Elena Sesma, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

  •   Demons Among the Thistles

Amanda Prouty, Department of History, Salem State University

Race and American Identity – Isenberg 128

Chair: Trent Maxey, Amherst College

Presentations:

  •   “Get First the Freedom of the Soil:” Settler Colonialism and the Politics of Justice in the Land Reform Movement of the 1840s-1850s

Antonina Woodsum, Department of Labor Studies, University of Massachusetts Amherst

  •   Why They’re Beating Us: American Misperceptions of Japanese Technological Superiority in the 1980s and 1990s

John Roberts, Department of History, University of Massachusetts Amherst

  •   “These Small Cylindrical Stools:” The Old China Trade in Henry James’s The Europeans

Matthew Bodmer, Department of English, University of Arizona

11:00-12:15Second Panel Sessions

Memory and Materiality – Isenberg 112

Chair: Marla Miller, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Presentations:

  •   Rethinking American Samplers: Pivotal Objects in Public Understanding

Kate Silbert, Departments of History and Women’s Studies, University of Michigan

  •   Meandering through Memory and Material

Asieh Harati, Department of Art History, McGill University

  •   Paul Ricoeur and the idea of “just memory” in the interpretation of past events

Nathalie Popa, McGill University

Telling Difficult History – Isenberg 128

Chair: Andrew Donson, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Presentations:

  •   The Aryan Contribution: Visualizing Race Through Architectural History in Charles Garnier’s Histoire de l’habitation humaine

Kylynn Jasinski, Department of Art and Architecture, University of Pittsburgh

  •   The Republican Race: Republicanism, Eugenics, and Race in the Anti-Jewish Policy of Vichy France

Stacy Veeder, Department of History, University at Albany

  •   “An All-German Day:”Myth and Memory of the July 20th Plot to Kill Hitler

Bryce Havens, Department of History, University of Massachusetts Amherst

12:15-1:30 – Lunch – Isenberg Atrium

1:30 – 2:45 - Third Panel Sessions

Landscape and Memory – Isenberg 112

Chair: Samuel Redman, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Presentations:

  •   Coastal Parks for a Metropolitan Nation: Public Perception of Postwar National Parks

Jackie Mullen, Department of History, University at Albany, SUNY

  •   “Still Looking For You:” Creating a Virtual Tour of South Bethlehem’s Lost Neighborhood

Danielle Lehr, Zackary Biro, Christopher Campbell, Department of History, Lehigh           University

  •   Knowing the Past Through Place: Archaeology and Indigenous Activism in British Columbia’s Slocan Valley

Erica Kowsz, Department of Anthropology, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Social Movements – Isenberg 128

Chair: Barbara Krauthamer, University of Massachusetts Amherst

Presentations:

  •   Conflict between Korean Nationalism and Feminism: The Life of Helen Kim as a Case Study

Ha Jung Lee, Department of Religious Studies, Boston University

  •   “Somos Atzlan:” Illuminating the Early Chicano/a Movement at the University of Utah

Rachel Povey, Department of Art History, University of Utah

  •   The Life of Richard Gregg: Uniting Non-violence, Simple Living, and the Politics of Pacifism
    Janelle Bourgeois, Department of History, University of Massachusetts Amherst

3:00-4:00 – Closing Remarks and Keynote Address – Isenberg 137

  •   Hidden in Plain Sight?: Rosa Parks and the Black Power Movement

Jeanne Theoharis, author of The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks

4:00 – 5:00 – Reception – Isenberg Atrium

Join us for wine, sweets, snacks, and conversation.

We will also have copies of Dr. Theoharis’s book The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks for sale.  Stop by to pick up a copy!

Notes

We encourage you to tweet throughout the conference today!  Use the hashtag: #UMassGHA14

Acknowledgements

The Graduate History Association officers, Erica Fagen (co-chair), Jacob Orcutt (co-chair), Karen Sause (treasurer), and Katie Garland (secretary) would like to thank all who helped to make this conference possible, including:

  • Dean John McCarthy and the UMass Graduate School, and the UMass History Department for generously helping to fund our conference.
  • Joye Bowman, Andrew Donson, David Glassberg, Barbara Krauthamer, Trent Maxey, Marla Miller and Samuel Redman for supporting the conference and serving as moderators.
  • Amy Fleig, Mary Lashway, and Suzanne Bell for their assistance with planning.
  • Marwa Amer, Janelle Bourgeois, Jonathan Dusenbury, Felicia Jamison, Mike Jirik, and Amanda Tewes for helping coordinate Dr. Theoharis’s visit and serving on the paper selection committee.
  • Kat McDonald for designing our poster and web banner.
  • Our graduate students including Thamy Almeida, Amy Breimaier, Jonathan Dusenbury, Veronica Golden, Matt Herrera, Emily Hunter, Deborah Kallman, Destiney Linker, Mike Jirik, and Amanda Tewes for serving on the day-of committee.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s